Infrared Nanospectroscopy: a Unique Pathway to Characterize Electrochemically Active Solid-Liquid Interfaces and Interphases

Infrared Nanospectroscopy: a Unique Pathway to Characterize Electrochemically Active Solid-Liquid Interfaces and Interphases

Abstract 

The advancement of basic energy storage science faces many challenges. Two such experimental challenges are (i) nondestructively accessing buried electrochemically active interfaces and (ii) characterizing such interfaces with (down to) nanometer scale resolutions.  In this talk, we focus on introducing infrared nanospectroscopy (nano-FTIR) as an ideal candidate to overcome the aforementioned challenges.  We provide an operational explanation as to how nano-FTIR breaks the diffraction limit to enable the collection of vibrational spectra from spatial regions with nanoscopic extent.  Thereafter we move to motive the use of nano-FTIR on electrochemical interfaces, in particular the solid-liquid interface, and demonstrate the unique advantages that such approaches facilitate.   These advantages include the ability to spatially and chemically characterize buried nanothin interphases that grow at solid-liquid interfaces, in their native environment, with nanoscale precision.  Finally we discuss relevant hurdles and opportunities broadly related to the exploration of liquid environments and solid-liquid interfaces with nano-FTIR. 

Speaker
Jonathan Larson received a B.S. degree in mathematics and physics from Longwood University in central Virginia where he was recruited to play basketball. After his undergraduate degree he taught 8th grade physical science before pursuing and obtaining a M.S. degree in physics from Auburn University. At Auburn, Jonathan’s research broadly focused on electrical energy generation by way of fusion. After his M.S. degree, Jonathan shifted his research focus from basic electrical energy generation, to basic electrical energy storage and joined the University of Maryland’s DOE-funded EFRC – Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage. While earning a Ph.D. in physics at Maryland, and subsequent postdoctoral position there, Jonathan conceived of, developed, and applied advanced scanning probe techniques to enable the characterization of electrochemical and ion transport phenomena at the micro-to-nanoscale. In the summer of 2018 Jonathan joined Dr. Kostecki’s research group at LBNL where he is currently a postdoctoral scholar and is working on developing infrared nanospectroscopy for application to energy storage systems.
Summary notes 
Date/Time 
Monday, December 7, 2020 -
3:00pm to 4:00pm
Type 
Seminar
PI 
Robert Kostecki